Victorian MP Fiona Patten Introduces Bill to Tax Religious Organisations

Victorian Upper House MP, Fiona Patten will today first read a Bill in the Victorian Parliament to amend the Charities Act 1978 to exclude the advancement of religion as a charitable purpose. This amendment will ensure that tax exemptions for charities in Victoria only apply to those organisations engaging in objectively charitable works.

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MP’s Apology Needed Ahead Of Royal Commission’s Report

The final report by the Royal Commission investigating Institutional Child Sex Abuse will soon be released and its findings will be shocking. Its truth will be welcomed by most people in Australia, however, there are members of parliament and law enforcement officials who repeatedly refused to accept calls for a Royal Commission despite the overwhelming evidence according to Victorian Upper House MP and leader of REASON, Fiona Patten MLC.


“In 2000 I published a dossier called Hypocrites, on the sexual abuse of children within religious institutions and named hundreds of convicted church clergy as evidence of the need for a Royal Commission,” detailed Fiona Patten MLC.

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The Age - The most admirable people in our parliaments

Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull is increasingly unpopular and distrusted because he is seen to lack the courage of his convictions, and be driven by a base lust for power. Opposition Leader Bill Shorten is perennially unpopular and distrusted because he is seen to have no convictions, and be driven by a lust for power.

Politics the world over is being roiled by seething discontent about inequality, unfairness and the apparent and unseemly readiness of lawmakers to subjugate public interest to party, personal and vested interests. But it would be unreasonable to decry the political class en masse, or to lose all faith in the political process.

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How Fiona Patten and REASON Initiated Voluntary Assisted Dying in Victoria

On the day that she was elected to the Victorian Upper House, Fiona Patten was asked by journalists what her first priority would be in parliament. She told them that she had made a commitment to voluntary euthanasia advocate, Peter Short, who was dying of cancer, that she would make voluntary assisted dying legal. The Premier, Daniel Andrews was asked on the same day what he thought of her plan. He said it would not happen.

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Vic Injecting room trial - Fiona Patten's perseverance pays off

Fiona Patten's perseverance has made the Victorian government see reason and approve a trial of a medically supervised injecting centre in Richmond. This will save lives.

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Fiona Patten learns the art of the possible in euthanasia lawmaking

Fiona Patten declares herself gratified to have played a significant role in Victoria's path towards becoming the first Australian state to allow euthanasia, even though the proposed legislation falls far short of her original permissive ambitions.

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The Rise of Black Market Tobacco

The recent discovery of a $12 million crop of illegal tobacco in bushland just south of Canberra, has law enforcement extremely worried. And so it should.  Anyone who knows anything about black markets knows that where there’s smoke there’s generally a raging bushfire not far away.

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Australian Cyclists Party Endorses Reason Movement

The Australian Cyclists Party will contest the next Federal Election by supporting the Reason Movement and its forthcoming application as a federal party

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REASON Growing in Australian Politics

Australia’s newest political movement, REASON, has been given a major boost in its second week.

The Australian Cyclists Party (ACP) has taken a decision to deregister as a federal political party and join the REASON movement.

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Minor Party voters chopped-off at the knees. What now?

  • Senate reforms have changed the game for small parties
  • Question for small parties and their voters: “How can we adapt to this new system, to remain effective agents of change?”
  • The effects of the reforms for small parties were hardly felt in the 2016 election, because of the double-dissolution
  • Fewer preferences, no preference planning, more exhausted votes
  • If small parties compete with each other next time, none of them win election
  • There’s no option but to grow
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